Professor Fizzby’s Wonderous Strange Collection of Wee Beasties Part 7 by Dimples Designs

A Project A Day – Counted embroidery work is my main hobby and I have a huge stitching stash. Some of these projects are huge and take years to stitch, and while others are quick projects, I often spend months without stitching at all. So while I have hundreds in my stash, only a half-dozen ever see attention any given year.  To address this imbalance in 2012 I will each day write about one project languishing in my stash.

Professor Fizzby’s Wonderous Strange Collection of Wee Beasties Part 7 by Dimples Designs

Copyright Terrence Nolan 2001.

Dimples Designs

Professor Fizzby's Wonderous Strange Collection of Wee Beasties Part 7 by Dimples Designs

Chart: Chart is shown three times. Once over a number of pages in large clear easy-to-follow symbols and a second time over five separate chart iterations each highlighting a separate section of the backstitching.  If only all black & white charts with intricate backstitch used this mechanism!

Stitches: Pattern uses whole cross stitches, partial cross stitch, one over one, and backstitch.

Materials: DMC stranded cotton, Kreinik blending filament and Kreinik #4 braid. Stitched on Wichelt 32ct “Vintage (Distressed)” Linen.

Designer’s Notes: My Dearest Amelia, Last night Dolittle and I were speaking once again about the wonders of the wee beasties we call the dragonfly. Sweetheart, I had no idea how charming and yet mysterious they really were until the good doctor started to share with me what some of the world’s oldest people think of them.

Did you know my sweet that in Philippine folklore it is believed that if you tied a dragonfly to someone’s hair, they would go mad. In Tahiti, it is commonly held that all insects, especially the dragonfly are agents of the gods and spirits of the universe, the dragonfly was known as the shadow of Hiro, god of thieves.

There is an ancient story, that tell of the Emperor of Japan being bitten by a horsefly, which is then eaten by a dragonfly. In honor of the dragonfly, the Emperor named Japan, Yamato, the Isles of the Dragonfly.

I tire now and so I am off to sleep, but I know that all my dreams will be of you. As always, I look forward to coming home and seeing your smiling face. In love, Fizzby.

Why I was attracted to this design: Oh I love the whole series of Professor Fizzby.  I want to hear the stories as much if not more than I want to stitch the charts!  So very Boys Own Adventure, what what! I do like charts of bugs and insects, especially accurate or fantastical ones, rather than cutesy ones.

So why haven’t I stitched it?  I had a grand plan of collecting all the Professor Fizzby charts (I think there were 13 official part charts and at least 16 charts in the series at last count). and then stitching them all adjacent to each other on the one piece of fabric. So it looked like one huge display or drawer of pinned insects like an old-fashioned natural history display. Attached to this, I would put a book of all the letters that go with all the charts, so the Professor’s journey could be read as a story or your could select just the page for that insect.

With my five-year old nephew becoming very interested in bugs and spiders and worms and praying mantis’ I should pull out of these charts, regardless of how many I do or don’t have and just start stitching them up anyway. Sometimes I think, the grander the scheme the less likely it will ever happen.

Where can you buy it? All of the Wee Beasties Parts (except Part 12) are out of print.  You might get lucky at your LNS or ONS, or I suggest checking eBay. Dimples Designs are well sought after but these charts should retail around $8US.

Discussion questions: So should I stick to the original grand plan and try to find the rest of this long out of print series, or should I just start stitching what I have?

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7 Responses to Professor Fizzby’s Wonderous Strange Collection of Wee Beasties Part 7 by Dimples Designs

  1. Karen R in GA says:

    I love these, too, and wish I had known about them when they were readily available. Stitch what you have – if you wait until you get the rest, there might not be any interest then.

  2. Sisu says:

    I would probably stitch what you have. You can always mount them frameless on a padded board and then mount those into a large open fram to look like individual specimen boxes. That way, your finish is not tied into one huge piece of fabric.

  3. kay jones says:

    I agree. Stitch what you;ve got. It might be worth letting the rest of us now which ones your’e looking for so that when we’re trawling for various things we can keep an eye out for them.

  4. Mel says:

    Ooooh good call Sisu – I like the specimen box idea – it also means I can get the fabric close but it doesn’t necessarily have to all be the same or from the same batch! I like it!

    Great ideas everyone thank you! Kay, the ones I don’t have are up at the old Multiply wish lists. I’m slowly getting them organised to move across but not fast enough 🙂

  5. rocalisa says:

    I love Sisu’s idea of the specimen box. Brilliant, Sisu.

    I’d go with that and then the project can finish up whatever size it finishes up and you’re not locked into one final result. With my own health issues, I’m all for that sort of thing so I can still have a finish regardless of how much I’m able to do at the time.

    • rocalisa says:

      P.S. I’ve added a “wee beasties” search to the NZ auction site just in case something comes up. If I get any hits I’ll forward them to you. Odds are not good, but it never hurts to try.

  6. Laura says:

    I remember seeing these when they came out and kept thinking I’d get them. Of course, I didn’t and now I’m left to wish I had. I like the idea of a specimen box. That could be really interesting and would allow for you to find the other patterns and stitch them up as well.

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